If you are interested in community data analytics, you will have several opportunities to discuss them during Akademy.

Firstly, there will be my talk titled Bringing Community Data Analysis Back to KDE (why the hell did I use "Analysis" there... I only used "Analytics" everywhere so far, odd). It will happen on Saturday at 15:30 in room IE7. The slot is a bit small for the topic, but I'll try my best to create interest. Indeed you can catch me around talks to chat about it, and...

Secondly, there will be a BoF "Discussing Community Data Analytics" on Monday at 10:30 in room 127. We hope to see people coming up with interesting questions to explore or willing to lend a hand in those explorations. See you there!

And of course it also means I'm on my way to Vienna, see you all during Akademy 2018!

I am Going to Akademy Banner

Posted on 10 Aug 2018
Tags: Akademy  KDE  Community  Data Analytics 

In my previous post I played with the team size and activity metrics on several communities and see what would come out of it. Interestingly, to me this wasn't necessarily the most interesting of what I posted (it's rather basic in what it presents) but somehow it's the one which triggered the most comments, especially in the KDE community. Looks like I struck a nerve. :-)

Anyway, it got quite a lot of good comments, so I thought it deserved a follow-up post with a different tone. For the record, I generally try to avoid putting too much of my own personal opinion in posts where I present metrics. I think it's sane to try to shield facts on the data from my biased position. It's obviously super hard, if not impossible. Indeed, at a minimum I'm forced to mention potential events in the time frame considered (if I know them)... it's risky, but still I do it because otherwise things would be just very dry and super annoying to read! And I think that's why the previous post struck a nerve, but more on that below.

In the rest of this post, I'll pick extract of the comments I got, in no particular order, followed by my own opinion. So contrary to my usual "data posts", the cursor between factual presentation and opinion piece will very much point toward "opinion piece". Be warned! ;-)

More Information About the Rust Community

I got a very nice comment from Florian Gilcher, I won't address it all, but I'll add my reactions to some of the extracts.

This doesn't mean that we have an explanation for everything. But I can certainly say that the slowdown in 2015 is a couple of people going on holidays and taking some time off for once. There was a lot of exhaustion and also tension in the community at that time.

Thanks a lot for the confirmation! When looking at the history of the project from the outside it seemed the most logical conclusion, glad to see I wasn't far off for once. ;-)

While I agree that we will probably not hold this growth forever, we are doing a lot of intentional work to make that happen. One of them is constantly reorganising the project and actively pulling people in.

That's what I got from attending a couple of RustFest. I was very much impressed by the efforts going on into growing the community. It's very proactive and welcoming while KDE has a more passive stance even though it's a very welcoming community as well.

We take a very clear stance that we want to recognise all work that people have done for the project and invest time in that, for example with projects like https://thanks.rust-lang.org/.

Wow, didn't know about that page! It's a great idea. I wonder if KDE has something similar, it's probably worth producing. Each application has an about box with some people, but there's nothing structured for the frameworks, also I like the breakdown per version used by Rust. Probably something I could script, I'll look into it I think.

We try to keep all processes as lean as possible and especially don't try to impose a huge process on first-time or small contributors. Contribution effort should scale with the size of it.

This is an interesting concern. Instead of going for a one size fit all contribution model. To be kept in mind for sure.

Also, I don't want to say that we do everything right - the contrary. But we have gotten our project used to reflection and change.

Right, I think it's important to maintain a culture which allows both to pass the wisdom of older contributors while also being open to change.

Debating the Impact of Tooling

From Florian Gilcher still, we got a point about tooling:

Talking a little about your readings here: In contrast to other comments, I don't find it unreasonable to attribute the bump in KDE to the change of tooling. [...] Free contribution also means that leaving is easy. And some people don't want to pay the mental tax of learning new tooling.

Of course I agree with that, and I think that's why KDE lost some of the old guard and quite a bit of the drive by contributions (Git was really painful at the time). Also, on top of the mental tax of learning the new tooling there's Conway's law to take into account, a switch means organizational changes which in turns mean quite some communication generated by it, updating our wiki pages for on boarding, team building and so on.

And we got a similar stance from Anton Latukha as well:

I strongly agree on "documented process of 100 steps or to follow" for contribution versus "documented process of 5 steps". It is so much, that I wanted, but really never bothered to contribute. It is just too much rules and info to fit-in myself for me to make drive-by commits.

I strongly agree with that point of course! It's not related to the "was the dip caused by the switch to git" debate, since most of the reasons why it's hard to contribute to KDE predates that switch anyway. But it's a very important thing to keep in mind if we want to improve. We don't get as many drive-by contributions as we could and it's unfortunate. People expectations are that it should be much easier than it is. That's why at last year Akademy we gave the talk Looking at the Application Developer Story with David Faure.

Of course there's also another position on that debate which consider the tooling as irrelevant in the contribution history of KDE.

First from Luke Parry:

In short, the excitement has gone. KDE has just become a utility that works pretty well for a DE. Yet, It is not pushing any boundaries of how we interact and work with a desktop.

It's indeed another factor to take into account and I agree with that. For some parts, KDE is just a commodity people are glad it's around and since it's not exciting enough anymore they don't feel compelled to contribute. Note this is worrying though because it means the community (not the software) has fallen in a kind of Tragedy of the Commons trap. That's why I think it's important to hear the comments from Florian above, they show a path forward: the KDE Community should be consciously groomed like a proper common (aka we're doing great on the software side, not so much on the people side).

Then we got comments from Martin Flöser who are very much on the "switch to git is irrelevant" side:

Personally I don't believe in the git theory for the kde community. It just doesn't fit. KDE is a highly technical community, our code has partially a superb quality. Why should the community metrics change just because the introduction of git?

I would say: just see Florian's and Anton's comments above. There's a cognitive cost to such changes, especially when git was really a pain to use.

Instead I would rephrase the question: what resulted in the 2010 peak? For this I see two main events in the KDE community: KDE 4 and Nokia buying Qt.

I agree about KDE 4 resulting in more activity, but not all the way to 2010. As for Nokia, well... I really don't think it brought much more to KDE than extra sponsorship. One particular project saw extra contributions due to Nokia, but it wouldn't account for a big increase in activity by a long shot.

After the release of KDE 4 new developers were brought in.

That's the thing, we always had a strong contributor influx. Except during KDE 4 preparation (it was very hard for people to join because everything moved all the time as the increased activity indicates) and after 2010... which is where we're debating the reasons still. :-)

If I remember correctly you still were a student at that time (or did you already do your phd?)

I already had my PhD at that time. Besides, I don't know if it goes like this for all PhDs everywhere, but it was really a full time job in my case. I was definitely not working like a student anymore through my PhD. Anyway, very specific and not very relevant so I won't dwell on this more. ;-)

So what did happen around 2010 that we did not get the new students in? My answer to that is Bologna and Android. From talking with Bachelor students around that time I got the impression that they don't have the time anymore to do things as open source development next to their studies. The second thing I mention is Android. I think for students we were no longer the interesting and attractive community to join. Why hack on the old thing if you could do Android apps?

I think that's where we touch the crux of the issue in this debate. I very much agree with the KDE 4 impact and the commodification of the KDE products. Now, I tend to ignore them because we can't act on them, and that's why I talk much more about the tooling: I know we can act on that part!

And that's where you disagree, you think that the tooling change had no impact on the existing community. Well, I'm pretty sure at least part of the "previous developers" were driven away both because of the personal reasons and the change of tooling. The two collided, learning new half done annoying to use tooling while having less spare time? No way they'd do that. Remember git back then it's was really very difficult to learn with all its quirks.

Second reason why the tooling matters: the students changed. It's not only about the time available and making Android apps being more hip. Post-PhD you might remember I was involved in an University program setting up student projects. They had the time, they had cool things to pick from, so only stuff they were motivated to work on. Still, over the years I could see it was less and less natural for them to contribute to KDE. There has been a strong cultural shift I witnessed over the course of a few years.

It became much easier for them to use git, but the paradox for me is that it became much harder for them to use the rest of our tools. Somehow as various generations of students became more skilled in Git, they also became more influenced (or brainwashed, pick your position) by the GitHub contribution model. And nowadays it's for them the only true way of contributing. Our current processes for contributing are thus looking very alien and preposterous to your average student. I don't like that, but that's what I witnessed.

Also Dominik points out git is a standard:

But git is the de-facto standard, it's not to blame for the decrease - well, at least not in the last 5 years.

Yes definitely. I was thinking of "git back then", which is in part why we lost a fair share of the old guard as mentioned above. Nowadays git is fine, but as I mentioned above the other tools seem to get in the way for new contributors.

About Comparing Projects

We got a couple of interesting points from Boudewijn as well revolving around comparing projects:

I think you should superimpose the rust graph on KDE's graph --- put the current 2018 location on KDE's 2010 location. Everything has a hype curve, skyrockets, drops then settles.

Yes, I definitely agree there and I mentioned that at the end of my previous post: the Rust curves currently look similar to KDE early days. That being said even if we do what you propose with the curves, there's still a difference between KDE and Rust in my opinion. Their team size and their commit count variations are much more strongly correlated than for KDE. The only time KDE had it in a similar fashion is roughly for its first five years as far as I can tell after quickly checking. They kept that almost twice as long now. This is interesting in itself I think.

It would also be interesting, but controversial, to make this graph for larger kde projects -- libs/frameworks, plasma, krita/calligra (that doesn't matter much, krita was always the larger part of koffice/calligra development), kdenlive, digikam, pim.

I don't think this would be controversial. And that's actually one of the gazillion things I'd like to do... so many angles to look at those things, I can keep myself busy for the next ten or twenty years I think. I kind of touched it a bit for PIM in my previous posts by the way.

On the Definition of Activity

Sho opened the debate on the commit count metric itself:

I think our commit count going down has a lot to do with how we do code review - which we didn't do before.

This could be a factor for the 2010 drop, I somehow doubt it is a strong one because I seem to recall we were already doing reviews in 2009. Now I agree that we likely increased the amount of reviews at some point, but it didn't take 6 years to do that. That'd account for some of the decreasing trend but not all.

This makes it difficult to assess activity by comment count alone without looking at diff sizes too.

Yes, this is something I'd like to explore better. Currently I use commit count for the activity, but I know it's a poor proxy for it: not all commits are born equal and also reviews is work and collaboration. The reviews I can likely get a partial history through the Phabricator API, but that will never go back many years. For the "value" of a commit, I still didn't find an approach I liked from what I drafted... still looking for one.

About the Choice of Phabricator

Finally, I got an unexpected comment from Anton Latukha regarding Phabricator:

Phabricator community/development is already virtually dead: https://www.openhub.net/p/phabricator

Obviously a very important point... It's really a shame because I personally like Phabricator quite a bit despite the fact it looks foreign to a fair share of our contributor base. Of course it makes things concerning since it became a very central piece of KDE's infrastructure.

Really it pains me (did I say I like Phabricator?) but between Phabricator's declining contributor base and what I've seen with students who consider it confusing, I wonder if we should reconsider it. I hate gratuitous tooling changes (see my points on their price above) but it looks like the price of staying with that particular choice might sooner or later increase by a lot... and it's already high (see my points above about it looking alien to nowadays students). :-/

Posted on 06 Aug 2018
Tags: KDE  Rust  Community  Data Analytics 

If you remember my previous installment I raised a couple more questions which I pointed out as tougher to address and I'd keep on the side for a while. Well, I decided to look at something simpler in the meantime... which unexpectedly took more time than expected.

First I thought I'd try to reproduce the cohesion graph from Paul's Akademy 2014 talk... but it looks like we have a reproducibility issue on that one. However hard I try I don't manage to reproduce it. What I get is very different, so either there's a bug in my tentative script or there was a bug in Paul's script or somehow the input data is different. So one more mysteries to explore, I'm at a loss about what's going on with that one so far.

Then I realized that already more than a month passed fiddling with that particular issue so I looked for something else. I still wanted something simple. That's why I went for weekly activity and team size for the whole history of some repository. Sure everyone does that, but I looked at how we could make this kind of things more readable to have a better idea of trends. Indeed most of the graphs I look at tend to be noisy. For instance if we look at Thiago's graphs about the Qt community, there's clearly valuable information but the ones covering the history "since the beginning" don't convey much idea about the trends. That's what I'll try to improve in the current installment. Similar data, just a different way to look at it.

The Transparent KDE Community

Let's start with the community closest to home: KDE.


First a note on the production of the graph itself. This is done by looking at all the available history of all the git repositories I could clone from KDE (I'm using kdesrc-build for that). The small dots are the absolute data points sampled per week. Since they (obviously) exhibit quite some noise, I then apply to them a low-pass filter which gives us the final line plots on top of the data points. They give us less accurate absolute value but better clues on the actual trends. Also note that the two curves are on different scales (one on the left the other on the right) so don't get confused about that. Again it's not about comparing absolute values between the curves but trends.

Before really focusing on the data in graph above, a note on the team size. Here we consider the size of the "team" producing commits for a given week. It's not telling us the whole size of the community, it's not even telling us the whole size of the developers community. It just tells us how many developers from the community have been active that particular week. So obviously the community size is larger than that. We have a simple model here, evaluating the community size would require something much more complex about heuristics on when someone can be considered not participating anymore or not. I'll sound like a broken record but this simple model is still relevant for showing trends in the activity level of a community so I'll stick with it for now.

With all of that in mind, it's interesting to see that active part of the community has been steadily growing until around 2010. This is clearly the tipping point and so after 2010 the community started to be less active. My gut feeling is that it's been also shrinking but the graph is no proof of that. At its peak there were around 200 people active each week, now it seems to be around 100 on average (yes I'm rounding aggressively here). The good thing is that from the plots, it seems it stabilized since 2016, but only time will tell if it stays stable or somehow grows again.

Also interesting to note is that the peak and beginning of the shrink is around the same period than the drop in cohesion pointed out by Paul in his Akademy 2014 talk.

So why the shrink? What happened around 2010? The only thing which comes to mind is our change of tooling... it's in fact the only thing which can explain both a reduction in cohesion and in size. Clearly we lost something with the switch to git, existing contributors were perhaps less motivated and newcomers were perhaps not joining as much.

It might sound surprising now that git is a big deal and extremely popular... but at the time it wasn't really a walk in the park. KDE has been an early adopter of git and for people with limited spare time it was yet another thing to learn. Now git is fashionable and learned by most but contributors are not coming back to us, so something is still amiss. Maybe our tooling is still too fragmented? Indeed people are used to very uniform platforms like GitHub or GitLab nowadays with a very organized view on the code and having to deal almost exclusively with git commands and a bit of web interface, we're nowhere near that. Maybe building our projects is still too complicated? Indeed people are used to grabbing the code, running a single build command and have the thing built and ready to run and hack on... we're nowhere near that.

That's why it's important that the onboarding of new contributors is now one of KDE's goals. Hopefully it will make sure that we don't just stabilize as we did now but start to grow again. I'm slightly concerned that it seems to focus mainly on documenting the status quo without necessarily improving the tooling. Don't take me wrong, documenting how to join us is super important! It's just that it needs to be made simpler as well. It's not the same impact on people interested to join to follow a documented process of 100 steps or to follow a documented process of 5 steps.

Now that I rambled about KDE... what about other communities?

The Dual-Licensed Qt

Let's check out on our friends from the Qt project! It's more of an industry type of community, plenty of people paid to contribute, the project is backed by a commercial owner. For that community I looked only at "Qt itself" which is not as easy to define than you would think. I basically went for the two main products: the qt repository (containing the Qt4 history), the qt5 repository and all its sub-modules and the qt-creator repository. That covers fairly well what you get if you install a SDK with only the Free Software components. Note that the history isn't as complete as in the KDE case so it's not going back to before the governance of Qt became open. This means we won't see all the way to Qt creation and it's likely that the beginning of the curves won't be reliable since they won't follow the right commit patterns and show instead big bulks of code in a limited number of commits by a limited number of people.


What a surprise! We can see it is very slowly getting less and less activity over time. Both the number of commits and the number of people active a given week has been stagnating or going down since 2010. Again before 2010 the numbers can't be trusted, but the graph reads as a decrease in activity as soon as the governance got opened. And there's no way to know if that was the trend already before opening the governance, we can't even gauge the correlation there.

Another surprise is the surge on the team size plot around 2012. It created a small surge in commits too but didn't change the overall trend on the commit count. This period would require an investigation of its own to get a clearer picture on its cause. My current theory after checking the "per employer activity" graph done by Thiago is that it seems to correlate both with KDAB getting much more involved in the development and KDE's effort toward KDE Frameworks creation.

As for the overall trend toward less activity, should we start to worry about Qt's health? Well, it depends what you are considering. Qt as a product, I wouldn't worry yet. If we look at absolute number it still clocks around 200 commits with around 50 contributors each weeks. For such a product it doesn't strike me as very low maintenance level. Qt as a community on the other hand... if the numbers are indeed correct (remember how I defined the corpus leading to the history we're looking at: it might have a blind side), I see no way to spin it positively. It is clearly a shrinking community (much like KDE as we've seen above).

Still, there's the Qt Company around they're in business and they seem to try to hire currently. So it's likely that there is a slow shift from the main repositories to other repositories (potentially non public). Not necessarily bad news for the product since it'll likely mean new features getting in down the line, etc. But even though it's not ideal community wise since it's harder to contribute.

The Crazy Multimedia People From VLC

And now what about VLC? It is after all one of the most successful Free Software out there. It's very specialized on its domain though (multimedia) and so as such maybe not showing the same activity profile than others? That's what we're going to look into.

Note that here I'm focusing only on vlc itself, but the VideoLAN Organization do more than just VLC. So please don't compare the plots below to KDE, it's slightly unfair comparison to both. It'd be as if I was plotting only one product from KDE.

Still I was curious about VLC itself since it's the least arcane of the projects from VideoLAN. Also I didn't find the time to produce an extensive and definitive list of the VideoLAN repositories. Something I'd like to do later though to have a more complete picture.


At a glance we can see a very different profile compared to the previous too and as such it was worth producing those plots. It seems to have a very stable community. The trends are clear, since 2003 we got a fairly stable team size and mostly stable commit count. That being said there are two points worth noticing.

First, we can see a five years period between 2007 and 2012 where the commit count is much more of a bumpy ride. Similarly on that period we see more of the community active at the same time then dropping again. It seems to match with a period of new ports of VLC on more platforms and the work leading up toward VLC 2.0. Surprisingly we don't see a similar pattern toward the preparation of VLC 3.0.

Second, despite a mostly stable team size since 2012, we can see a constant increase in commits over time. So it looks like the patch leading up to VLC 3.0 had a different pattern than the one leading up to VLC 2.0. The activity increased but mostly in commits under the roughly the same number of people each weak. That means the turn around of commits per person was higher during that period than before. This is a clear change of pattern since VLC 2.0. My current theory would be that it could be caused by the creation of Videolabs which is a company created in 2012 and employing mostly VLC developers. This company provides services around VLC and multimedia. It is the only event that I know of which would explain that plot. That being said and as mentioned above I have only a partial view of the VideoLAN history here, so take that theory with caution.

The Very Successful Rust

And last but not least, I wanted to take a very quick peak at Rust. It's very different from our previous cases, no application or frameworks in the traditional sense but a language. It seems very popular toward developers using it, I'm personally interested in it hence why it is in that post.

Due to its nature it's even harder to choose a corpus of repositories to define it... Should I take just the compiler? Other tooling? Documentation? Should I try to reach toward the whole ecosystem since it's a language? I decided to go for compiler, tooling and documentation (that is mostly code coming from rust-lang and rust-lang-nursery). It made sense to go for those because they really are an integral part of the "Rust experience" if you look at it as a coherent product. Just the compiler would be clearly too small, and the whole ecosystem would drown us in data which would just tell us how popular Rust is to its users which is not what we're after here.


First word which comes to mind: wow! Indeed, it's very successful and clearly skyrocketing currently. There's just a slowdown in 2015 for which I have no good explanation, maybe people were tired after releasing 1.0? If someone who knows intimately the Rust community has another theory I'm very eager to hear it.

Anyway, apart from 2015, both the team size and the commit count are still correlated and they just go up, and up and up. Clearly they are doing something right and are very successful at attracting contributors to Rust itself. I'd say it's not just a fad with people playing with it and making libraries or apps with it. It looks like they manage to convert users into contributors very successfully. Well done!

Now of course it's a much younger project, so time will only tell when it will plateau and if it starts shrinking again. For now, it's clearly looking similar to the first years of KDE. Maybe the KDE community should look more at Rust and find ideas on how to be so popular again.

Posted on 22 Jun 2018
Tags: KDE  Qt  VideoLAN  Rust  Community  Data Analytics 

At the end of my previous post we concluded with yet another question. Indeed, on the 2017 KDEPIM contributor network we found out that Christian Mollekopf while being a very consistent committer didn't appear as centrality as we would expect. Yet from the topology he seemed to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality. This time we'll try to look into this and figure out what might be going on.

My first attempt at this was to try to look into the contributor network on a different time period and see how it goes. If we take two snapshots of the network for the two semesters of 2017, how would it look? Well, easy to do with my current scripts so let's see!


Alright, it still looks similar to the picture we got for the full 2017... Christian is still on the outter rings of our network and bridging toward low centrality nodes. Only difference is that he has a slightly higher centrality value than during the whole year. Needless to say just that semester doesn't learn us much. Time to look at the second semester then.


Ah-Ah! Now we see something new, Christian is now mostly disconnected from the network! He is part of a clique containing him and Michael Bohlender. Looking further at their activity they are indeed focusing almost exclusively on Kube. Michael was in fact one of those low centrality nodes Christian was bridging to previously.

So what are we looking at? It seems to be the birth of an insular sub-team in the KDEPIM community. It's technically not a fork since they're working on a specific software but this clique configuration indicates they moved their focus there, they didn't attract the rest of the KDEPIM community to contribute (yet?) and they stopped contributing completely to the wider KDEPIM effort (at least for the time frame we've been looking at). The community got split there.

Now we could leave it at that and consider it like a detail... or... if you're like me and want not only to produce those graphs and metrics but wonder if some of those things could be turned into useful tools for community stewardship in general and the Community Working Group in particular, you won't stop there.

From the two networks above and the one I produced the last time it's clear that we need to deal with time... From a single network we freeze the time and get a configuration for a given period. If we ever want to see that something like the clique we saw appearing here can be detected we need a less static view.

For the time being, we will look at individual centrality of a contributor over time. For that we will get their monthly centrality value in the network over a three months sliding window (previous month, current month and next month). Since it's also interesting to have an idea of the activity of the contributor over the time period, we'll also plot the normalized monthly activity of the contributor. Finally, since centrality is dependent on the team size, we'll plot the normalized team size on the period.

Regarding that last plot, a few more words because it's a fairly important one that Volker Krause helped me realize during the KDEPIM sprint because of his own plots and discussing them with him, unfortunately it's also what makes the centrality tricky to read. The centrality value of a node is a value between 0 and 1, if a node is not connected at all it gets a 0 if a node is connected to all other nodes it gets a 1. So obviously, if the team is large you need way more connections to get a high centrality than in a small team.

Corollary of the point above is that centrality values variation are meaningful only during a stable team size. If we're a period of decreasing or increasing team size variations on a centrality can occur for a node even though it would have maintained the exact same connections! And that's why we have the third plot on the team size in the graphs below to get an idea on how much trust we can put in the variation of the centrality plot.

Alright, with that out of the way (although it'll keep haunting us while reading those plots), now it's time to explore those plots. We won't look only at one, I think it's a good idea to look at more than one contribution pattern before coming back to Christian. To get there and keep those plots somewhat comparable I'll drastically expand the time period we'll look at, instead of looking at 2017 only, we'll go all the way back to 2007! This way we can see more of KDEPIM's history and get patterns also from old timers. Let's start!


So first thing first, we see the evolution of the team size in KDEPIM on the last ten years. Interestingly we see the decrease that Paul Adams was pointing out in his last Akademy talk... but it's not reaching the ground and it looks like it stabilized at least since 2014. Is it the case for the whole of KDE? Does the commit activity look the same globally? Clearly questions I'll have to investigate as well, it never ends! :-)

In any case this variation on team size seems to indicate that we can look at the centrality variations from 2007 to end of 2009 or from 2014 to the end of 2017 somewhat safely. Of course the team size keeps varying but it's more noise than a real trend so it should be fine overall.

With that in mind, what we can see from Till is a former core contributor who slowly stopped to contribute. This is crystal clear just from his activity plot and the centrality plot as expected follows the same pattern. It's indeed less correlated with his activity in the 2010 to 2012 period but that's to be expected with the downward trend in team size.


This second graph is now about Volker Krause. We can see the top activity he had during 2009 and because the team size was large at the time it required such a high activity for him to have his centrality spike as well. The mystery spike of September 2016 is what prompted the display of the team size plot. He had only a very tiny activity that month which generated a surge in centrality... well it turns out that even though he did only a hand full of commits some of them were on build system files which tend to be touched by others and because of the smaller team size than in 2009 the variation get amplified.

So now that we're done with our two "example" core contributors... let's get back in the territory of the very active contributors of the past year...


Let's look at Laurent in this third graph, clearly he has been contributing to KDEPIM for a long time but overall not on a very high volume. It really started to increase around 2012 so I guess that's when he slowly took over maintainership of KMail. As expected that's when we see his centrality raising as well as he was getting involved with more and more components of KDEPIM. Of course it's slightly amplified by the decrease of team size over the 2012 - 2014 period but he kept getting more central even after that.


And finally, this fourth graph gets us back to Christian. Clearly he joined KDEPIM at the end of 2010, from that point on he looks like any other future contributor with increased activity correlating with increased centrality (watch out for the decrease of team size until 2014 which amplifies a bit the effect on that period). Then during 2014 we have a somewhat stable centrality and activity. Some noise but nothing out of the ordinary over a year. It gets interesting after that though. During 2015 we see his activity increasing again but at the same time his centrality starts dropping a first time. It then stays somewhat stable while his activity spikes. And toward the end of 2017 centrality completely drops. This is a very different pattern from all the other contributors we looked at.

In my opinion, the interesting observation is that by looking at the contributor network, we see the clique only appearing at the second semester of 2017, but, on the centrality graph we see this pattern of increasing activity with decreasing centrality starting in 2015! Two years before the community split is visible.

Now the question I have, and I think it'll be a tough one so I might leave it unanswered for a little while. Could we detect this kind of pattern early? Could we detect without too much false positive (even though there always will be some of them)?

I think it's important to think about that because in that particular case, assuming we'd have such a tool, the Community Working Group would have been warned of a team split to come and maybe step in to see if they could save the situation. Currently our Community Working Group is mostly working in reactive mode since they talk to people when a conflict emerges, with such a tool they could also try to be proactive and check on a team if the "increasing activity with decreasing centrality" pattern emerges. I think it would be nice if they could do this and talk to people before too many feelings were hurt.

It'll take time to get there, if at all. But I think it's worth looking into.

Posted on 22 Apr 2018
Tags: KDE  Community  Data Analytics 

If you remember at the end of my previous post, I raised a set of questions. Two were related to the use of colors in the graphs I showed:

  • Are the four levels of colors for the activity visualization enough?
  • Should we have some color coding on the nodes and use different layouts?

Since I had limited time lately to push on the other questions I thought I would do something about the colors at least. :-)

So let's revisit our "whole year 2017 for all of KDEPIM" (that is the parts in KDE Applications, in Extragear and in Playground) with more colors!

Firstly, this gives us the weekly activity using the "Magma" palette and a linear interpolation of the colors between the minimum and maximum commit counts:


Like before we see Laurent Montel and Christian Mollekopf as most consistent committers throughout the year 2017. That being said the new palette also allows us to see more things. First, it's not only that Laurent Montel is engaged every week it is also that he has more commits than anyone else almost each week! We can also now more clearly see unusual spikes of activities from Volker Krause and from Daniel Vrátil both on week 37.

I think that next I'll try to investigate why Laurent's commit count is so high and what happened on week 37 last year. But that will be for a next installment, stay tuned!

Secondly, this also gives us a new contributor network graph. I adjusted it in several ways: removed all visual clues on where the (0;0) point is, it's highly irrelevant but people seem to cling to it and try to interpret it; I also switched back to "Kamada & Kawai" for the force-directed layout since it's the one which helps the most to perceive the graph topology; finally I color coded the nodes depending on their centrality. For that last part I used the "Magma" palette again linearized on the full scale of centrality values of the graph. And since there are more than one definition of centrality I used the Degree Centrality. This is the simplest one and is a defined for a given node as "the fraction of nodes it is connected to". Since we's still in the mind set of finding out the contributors who collaborate with the most people through the files they commit too it's very suitable.


This time we don't even need to zoom in to spot the code KDEPIM contributors in 2017. With the color coding, we see right away again that Laurent Montel, Daniel Vratil and Volker Krause are the core contributors. It's much less guess work than the last time, we're backed by the color coded centrality metric now. We can also better see that Allen Winter, Sandro Knauß and David Faure are very central too, something that we missed the last time.

Now what about Christian Mollekopf who is our other consistent committer? In the activity graph, with a better view of the topology like we have thanks to "Kamada & Kawai" we manage to find him on one of the outter rings (he's the pale orange node on the top left of the graph). He's indeed not very central considering the "degree centrality" but we can see that he seems to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality.

This is an interesting new finding probably worth chasing further.

As you can see I'm not done exploring this data set! More questions are showing up before I can move to another area of KDE I think.

Posted on 06 Apr 2018
Tags: KDE  Community  Data Analytics 

As you might remember our dear Paul Adams decided to retire, this is a loss because of the person... But he was also providing a very nice service in the form of community data visualization. He was famously known among us for his "green blobs (turned blue blobs) and contributor network graphs".

Note that he just took the "green blobs" idea from Adriaan de Groot and later on turned them blue... He might have made them popular in the process but it's unclear if that's due to the color change or his prose. ;-)

Anyway, he was doing that for other communities than KDE, but he almost stopped now. For instance, he did it only once for Habitat in all of 2017. Luckily he published the scripts he was using in his git-viz repository so not all the knowledge was lost.

Earlier this year, I decided to take the torch and try to get into community data analytics myself. I got in touch with Paul to talk a bit about my plans. My first step was to try to modernize his scripts while staying true to his original visualization.

It turned out in an almost complete rewrite which I didn't quite expect. At the same time I wanted this modernization to be a good base for other visualization and also general data analytics. The most prominent part remaining is his git log parsing code although I extended it to work properly across repositories and not just on a single one. But next to that I'm now using pandas, networkx and bokeh for all the data processing and visualization descriptions. This turned out in nice, concise and maintainable code.

So you might wonder... What's possible now? Well, fairly similar visualizations than before but now they can span on more than one repository and they are fully interactive! No more fixed resolution pictures we generate fully dynamic HTML code.

To validate the scripts I used them on the whole year 2017 for all of KDEPIM (that is the parts in KDE Applications, in Extragear and in Playground).

Firstly, this gives us the infamous blue blobs diagram to show contributor weekly activity in all those repositories in 2017:


Clearly we can spot Christian Mollekopf and Laurent Montel as the most consistent committers throughout the year 2017. It should come as unsurprising since they are almost single handedly maintaining Kube/Sink and the rest of KDEPIM respectively. Daniel Vratil, maintainer of Akonadi is also very active and noticeable.

Secondly, this also gives us back the contributor network graphs. Here I did a small exception and used "Fruchterman & Reingold" for the force-directed layout instead of the "Kamada & Kawai" one. This is simply due to a personal preference. I find that in practice "Fruchterman & Reingold" is a bit more agressive at conserving the center for the cluster of most connected (core) contributors (although it sacrifices a bit in readability). So for all the KDEPIM repositories in 2017, we obtain the following network:


Surprisingly we can spot two disconnected nodes. Those two contributors touched files no one else touched in 2017. Nothing out of the ordinary, after investigating those two they were very self-contained punctual contributions for default SPAM settings and for improved wording in the GUI. Valuable but indeed don't necessarily require very deep integration in the core contributors network.

Then if we zoom in, we can easily spot the core KDEPIM contributors in 2017: Laurent Montel, Daniel Vratil and Volker Krause. They are the ones who connected most to other contributors via their commits last year. Of course this is a bit of a visual check and as such not very scientific.

Which leads me to the "what's next?" question.

Now I plan to build up on that work and add more tools and analysis. Paul's scripts and graphs were an excellent start hence why I did my best to stick to them. But now it's time to add more! Their are various questions which can be pursued:

  • Are the four levels of colors for the activity visualization enough? Could we get better insights with a different palette? Should we get closer to a heat map?
  • Could we get some more insights from using different frequency for the activity graph than weekly? Can we learn from daily activity on shorter lengths? Or from monthly on longer scale?
  • Should we really look at the contributor network as is? Could we plot it over time and see it evolve dynamically is there insights there or would it just look pretty? Should we have some color coding on the nodes and use different layouts?
  • Should we have a higher level view on the contributor network? Maybe we would get more information from finding cliques and plotting their relationships?
  • Or should we ditch the contributor network representation altogether? Should we instead plot metrics on the graph structure itself over time (like the density or connectivities)?
  • Of course we can come up with even more visualizations and analysis departing further from activity and contributor network (for instance, I suspect we could ease a bit copyright attribution from files to make it easier to contact contributors in case of license changes... I had to do it once for a couple of files and it's fairly manual and error prone process for now).
  • And can we process more than the git commits? What about collaborations on reviews? What about interactions on public mailing lists? For sure there are extra insights hiding in there which would also open up non development activities, at some point I'd like to get an idea of the promo people and designers activities too!

Of course, there are other people doing such community analysis work out there, like GrimoireLab, Gitential and more... They are more providing off-the-shelf solutions than what I'm after. But probably some inspiration can be taken from them too!

The scripts I've been using for the visualizations above are available in my ComDaAn repository. Of course I hope to get them to evolve and to have new ones appear due to the questions listed in this post.

As you can see, it opens up a very large field and I'd like to explore more of those questions in the future and also try to apply them on other communities for which I likely have less preconceived knowledge and biases than KDE.

Posted on 01 Mar 2018
Tags: KDE  Community  Data Analytics 

At the end of 2012, I started a series of post explaining the genesis of the KDE Manifesto. In that series, I pointed out that it took our community six years to go from the pains generated by our growth to creating the needed tool to solve them: namely the KDE Manifesto.

It took us an awfully long time... but it looks like we're getting better at dealing with this kind of community changes. Indeed, this time it took us only three years between Akademy 2014 where Paul Adams delivered his wake up call about our loss in cohesion and Akademy 2017 where a group of old timers (including yours truly) proposed a way to federate our community behind common goal again. It's too bad Paul decided to retire before he could witness that change!

It took a bit of time to put things in motion, but the community finally chose three goals for itself. This nicely concludes the Evolving KDE initiative pushed by Lydia.

I'm excited to see how those goals will progress in 2018 and beyond and how they will impact our community. Will they indeed bring more cohesion again? Will it be measurable?

Those are interesting questions that I'd like to explore... Paul retired, so maybe it's time I try myself at the community metrics work he was doing.

As the year 2017 is ending and the year 2018 is almost upon us, I'm looking forward to another year of work by all the busy bees forming the KDE Community.

We need some help to get there though, if like me you like the direction set in the KDE goals, consider participating in the End of 2017 Fundraiser. Don't wait, only four days left! You can power KDE too!

Posted on 27 Dec 2017
Tags: KDE  Community  Manifesto  Evolving 

Hey Community!

Long time no see, huh? Yes, I neglected my blog and as such didn't post anything since Akademy 2014... Interestingly this is the last one where my dear Paul Adams held a famous talk. Talk he is referring to in his latest piece. Since his blog aggregation to Planet KDE is broken, I thought it would be a good idea to relay it on my own blog to give it more exposure. It is reproduced below, if you want to read it in its original form, click through the title.

Paul, the mic is yours now!

Retired From KDE, by Paul Adams

Many of you reading this are probably already aware, long-time maintainer of glibc Roland McGrath has recently retired from maintaining that project. Inspired by his words, I wanted to say a few things about why I no longer contribute to KDE; a project I “retired” from some time ago now.

Recently two very good friends of mine, both long-term KDE contributors, inquired if I was going to be attending this year’s Akademy (the annual KDE conference). Neither were particularly surprised when I said I wasn’t.

I was surprised that they asked.

Getting Into KDE

My first experiences of KDE were many moons ago; sometime in the very early 00s I guess. I had installed Linux on an old machine and was not particularly enjoying the desktop experience.

There wasn’t a desktop.

I cannot remember which distro this was. It had come off some magazine’s cover CD. There was X. And the tiling window manager which allowed me to fill my screen with x-term. This, for a long time, was just how I got stuff done. Emacs, Mutt, Lynx and some weird terminal-based MP3 player were my jam.

Some time later I was reading another magazine (Linux Format?) and it had a review of a recent beta of KDE 2. The sources were included on the cover CD. KDE looked kinda nice. Less boxy and purple than the only other *nix desktop I had seen, CDE. Until I finished my undergraduate degree KDE was my go-to desktop.

Getting Deeper

For a while I had reverted to using a tiling window manager and a screenful of x-term. This was just a convenient way for me to get through my PhD and my day job.

During my PhD I was studying Free Software community productivity metrics. I was also working on research into software quality funded by the European Commission. KDE eV (the governance body1 for KDE) was also taking part in that project. At this time KDE was almost ready to release KDE 4. It was an exciting time to get involved.

So I installed whatever the Debian stable KDE desktop (3.1021933933923932) of the time and really enjoyed the experience. Having rediscovered my love for KDE and having met some of the active community, I dived in deeper.

KDE became high on my list of projects to study during my PhD. The community was going through major changes: not only was KDE 4 on its way in, but KDE SVN was on its way out.

Gitting Ready For Change

Around 2006 I discovered Ade de Groot’s tool for visualising contributions to SVN; it was part of the English Breakfast Network3. His version of this tool utilised Python’s SVN bindings to read the repo data. Git instinct told me this tool would work faster if it parsed SVN logs rather than read the repo data through a library. I turned out to be right and this was a formative moment in my career.

I created a generic SVN log parser for use by this visualisation tool and used the same parser for other purposes; mostly other visualisations and data plotting. The ultimate aim was to expose to the KDE community what we could learn about social interactions within the community from, arguably, its most important communication tool: the version control system.

KDE SVN was4 truly enormous. It was pretty much the largest SVN repo in the wild. One very large central repo which represented the entire body of KDE code/artefacts. Around this time the strains of using such a repo with such a huge (and growing) community were prompting discussion about distributed VCS.

These were remarkably mature and structured discussions. Git was, by no means, a foregone conclusion. Other distributed VCS were given headroom and this was the first (and, basically, last) time I played with Mercurial and Bazaar. The discussions were, for the most part, very technical. I raised my voice to talk about the potential social impacts of switching from SVN to distributed VCS. Any distributed VCS.

Joining KDE eV

I spoke at Akademy and other KDE events (including the KDE 4 launch at the Googleplex) about the research I was doing; either my PhD or the EC-funded stuff. I blogged. I dented5. My work was positively received and gearheads would actively reach out to me for more-detailed analysis of their corner of KDE.

I was encouraged to join KDE eV and I did. Given that I had made precisely 0 code contributions6 to KDE this, to me, felt like an achievement.

Since day one of my involvement, KDE eV had somewhat of an identity crisis. It was really not 100% clear what it did… but anyone who had been involved with KDE for more than 6 months was highly encouraged to join. Before long it had become bloated; lots of members contributing almost nothing and the few people wanting to do something not getting enough support to do it.

KDE has switched to Git and the social changes were a-happenin’. The KDE project was starting to lose its social cohesion. Post KDE 4.0-release blues, the switch to GIT and a lack of care from KDE eV all contributed here. Other things, too. No one thing started the KDE community’s cohesion degradation. But we felt it. We even went though a rebranding… KDE was not a desktop project, it had become a suite of projects and the desktop was just one of them.

KDE had evolved and I had not.

Cohesion Degredation?

One of the metrics I worked on during my PhD was a simple use of graph theory to measure how well-connected a community is. The contribution I made here was intriguing: as project get bigger they become less cohesive, but through careful community management, luck and clever structure, KDE avoided this.

The last time I properly attended Akademy (the KDE community conference) was back in 2014. I’d been frustrated for some time with my inability to drive home the message that the switch to GIT had o be managed properly. I’d been frustrated that nobody seemed to have noticed that my warnings were coming true.

So I gave a talk that year.

Deep down, I knew this was my last public outing on behalf of KDE. It was. After my talk a lot of people came up to discuss the mic I had just dropped. But as the days and weeks passed after the event, the message disappeared. And so did I.

So Why Are You Telling Us This Now?

This year’s KDE conference starts tomorrow. Two of my all-time best buddy KDE community members reached out to see if I was turning up.

They knew I wasn’t.

While we briefly reminisced by email, one of them pointed out that my talk from 2014 had recently come up in conversation on a KDE mailing list. That, 3 years later, the talk was being used as part of a great discussion about change in the project.

I’m really not sure what my emotion about that was. But, I did not feel compelled to join the discussion. I did not feel a need to remind people about what I was trying to achieve all that time ago. Nope. Instead, I went and pushed some changes to a core plan I had been working on for Habitat, the new home for my free time.

The Thanks

To all my friends in KDE:

Enjoy Akademy. Enjoy the opportunity to do some navel gazing. Enjoy the food, the drinks, the sun. Hack. Break shit and put it back together again. Remind yourselves of why KDE is special. Remind yourselves of why it is important. Very important.

I thank you all for the time we spent together.

We were all part of the solution.

Footnotes

  1. Countdown to flamewar… 3… 2… 1… I know many will object to me calling KDE eV a “governance body” but, no matter how you cut it, that is what it is. At least it should be, imo. 

  2. There were approximately this number of KDE 3 releases. 

  3. Is the EBN still a thing? 

  4. Is? 

  5. Is identi.ca still a thing? 

  6. Thanks to the EBN, I did actually fix a spelling error in a comment in a .h file for Marble7

  7. This makes me a true C++ h4xX0r, right? 

  • otherwise throw away no feature branches needed when:
  • focused team
  • effort predictability

experiments and collaboration implies quantum effect branches

in any case lifetime upper bound

Posted on 22 Jul 2017
Tags: KDE  Community 

I am back from Akademy and this edition was particularly interesting in my opinion. Somehow it looks like there was a common theme hidden in this conference... let's go through what I consider the most noticeable events of Akademy 2014.

Even before the official start of the conference, during the KDE e.V. general assembly we had something interesting happening. We had elections for three out of five positions in the board. During the questions to the candidates (thanks all for stepping up!), it was clear that the membership was looking for people aiming at a higher efficiency and then improved KDE e.V. organization. We will see if our new board will live up to those expectations. It sounds like a new cycle of radical improvements will start after a (needed) period of consolidation and stabilization.

Then, the first keynote by Sascha Meinrath was an excellent reminder that we should be more proactive on the political landscape. If we stay in reactive mode just producing software, we won't be able to prevent centralized infrastructure, opaque Internet of Things and the panoptic surveillance system. Only by aiming at a higher political involvement can we avoid the raise of a digital feudalism age.

After this keynote, during the three days of talks and workshops, a surprising amount of sessions were focused on quality in a form or another. I was obviously guilty there with my craftsmanship cycle but Albert too. Add to those the talks from the VDG, the workshop on profiling by Milian and the one on unit tests by Shantanu to easily figure out that there's quite a few people wishing to see our contributors aiming at higher quality.

Last but not least, Paul's talk on community metrics was likely the most important one to attend this year. If you didn't attend it: go and watch the video now! I'll wait... This talk is really a wake up call in my opinion. We lost something and we need to get it back. He pointed out a silent crisis going on in the community. We still have time to get back on the right track, but we got to find the root causes and act as soon as possible. What Paul proposes is to aim at a higher cohesion in the community again. That will require a better shared technical vision, a stronger focus on our mission toward our users and a stronger focus on getting better in our contributions.

By now it is clear that the common theme of Akademy 2014 was that we ought to generally aim higher. Overall, we are in a good position today. Unfortunately, that is also a very fragile one as the community metrics and the quality related talks highlighted.

We're likely at the crossroads now. The decisions we'll take in the coming weeks and months will lead us either to regress or to strive. In my opinion, we can only strive by improving in the areas mentioned above. In some way, that is very good news! We are mostly in control of those areas to improve. It means that success is reachable if we have enough collective willpower to do what's required to seize it.

Posted on 14 Sep 2014
Tags: KDE  Akademy  Craftsmanship  Community 

I meant to write a post about the upcoming Akademy for a while now. Since I submitted quite a few sessions (obviously requiring preparation) and I had to prepare for the KDE Frameworks BoF, I never quite found the time... until now! I'm all done! Actually I just have to pack my bags and hit the road at that point. It's probably the first Akademy where I'm ready four days before the first flight of my journey.

Anyway, Paul's post on what he plans to see inspired me to do something similar. Let's see how I'll navigate the tracks during Akademy.

Day 0: KDE e.V. General Assembly

The day before the fun begins for the community at large, the KDE e.V. membership gathers for its annual general assembly. It can be perceived as a day long boring meeting (I know some do), but it's clearly not like that. It is a very crucial event as KDE e.V. has important responsibilities in order to help the community. For instance such a body is necessary for Akademy itself to exist! It is also represented in the KDE-FreeQt foundation...

Clearly an organization not to be underestimated. This year assembly will be especially exciting as several positions are opening in the Board of Directors, which means elections... and candidates. We have quite a few this year which is a good sign of liveliness.

Day 1: Digital Feudalism, Tech and Community

Obviously I can't miss Sascha Meinrath's keynote. I had the opportunity to meet Sascha during FISL 15 earlier this year. He is probably one of the most interesting persons I met during the last couple of years! I discussed with him some of the points he'll likely touch in his keynote about Digital Feudalism. Definitely something people should attend as it is crucial for the years to come in the Free Software movement.

Then I will obviously attend the fast track session. To me we got a few which clearly stand out like GCompris transition to QtQuick, Everything Qt, A year with Akonadi and Using KF5 in commercial applications. This fast track will conclude my first morning.

The afternoon is then packed with quite a few interesting talks. Since I can't duplicate myself I won't be able to attend everything I'd like to... I urge application developers to attend Porting to KDE Frameworks 5 and Porting to QML.

That said... in the tradition of "do as I say not as I do", I'll attend something else instead... told you I had to make tough calls! I will run in the room 2 and stay there the whole afternoon.

I'll first attend War of Idioms by Ivan. The man knows his C++ standards and is definitely enthusiastic about some of the recent changes. So am I! I had the opportunity to use new idioms while working in projects with C++11 support, so I'm looking forward to learn new ones thanks to Ivan.

Then I'll attend A tale of ELFs and DWARFs by Volker. From the abstract it could sound as something very low level, maybe it is somewhat low level... but that is impacting everything we do when developing native code. Since that's what we mostly do in our community it's good for your toolbox to know linking and loading to be able to get out of troubles when needed. Definitely healthy, like eating your veggies at every meal.

After that I'll switch in community mode, looking forward to the Board of KDE e.V. session. Curious about the KDE e.V.? You know, the organization I mentioned above as crucial. Yes, that's what I thought: you should attend this session too!

Still in community mode I'll make sure to pay attention in the KDE in Asia session. I have some kind of fascination for what's going on there. We got people in those countries doing amazing things and organizing great events. We ought to learn and seek inspiration from them. That talk has quite a few lessons for us doing promo work in Europe I'm sure.

Day 2: Craftsmanship, Usability and Design

This one will be my big day... so obviously I can't attend everything I'd like again.

At least I will be listening to Cornelius' keynote. I'm curious about his take on the personal growth experience working in a community like KDE might bring. Like him, I joined for technology but stayed for the community. I also know we have different point of views on the finer details so that will be interesting to have a broader view in a different frame of reference like that.

Then I will be on stage during the fast track session to deliver my KDE Craftsmen talk. As I said, like Cornelius I see personal growth opportunities in the community, but I think we don't seize them as much as we could. I'll make the case of why that is and where we could look for inspiration.

Of my fellow fast trackers, I'm especially looking forward to A quick guide how you can save the world or why it is impossible to do usability (what a long title for a short talk!) by Björn Balazs. Another of those skilled people which inspired me in the past, looking forward to what he's up to.

After lunch, just like on day 1, I will stay in the same room the whole afternoon. Only this time it will be room 1...

First I'll pay a visit to Andrew Lake's Community Design and the KDE Visual Design Group. Being stuck in the lower stack so far I didn't get many opportunities to interact with the people in the Visual Design Group. They did a massive job so far so I'm eager to know more on how they got there!

Next, I'll stay for The Designer and its habits by Jens Reuterberg and Thomas Pfeiffer. Looks like I couldn't get enough with only one designer related talk, so let's go for two! More seriously, I'm convinced that we could do better with truly multidisciplinary teams, and that talk might just show a path to creating those.

After that I would have loved to attend Jonathan Riddell's talk titled Do you need to be brain damaged to care about desktop Linux?. Unfortunately I'll have to pass since it will clash with my own talks...

I will give my two sessions almost back to back apparently and that's perfectly logical. You might not guess it from the title but one is the continuation of the other. In Agile to the Rescue, I'll explore the reasons why we probably need to take inspiration of what's going on in the agile community and what we should borrow immediately. In Rebooting Zanshin, I will present the type of results you can obtain by applying the principles devised in the other talk. I will show some code and metrics gathered on the project.

Probably tired of my three talks, I'll gently end the day by attending David Faure Breaks The Law!? by Paul Adams. I expect this talk to be fun in the great Humongous tradition of the term... don't be fooled though! The form might be funny, but the man is also among the most knowledgeable people on community dynamics and management I know of. I'm curious about his findings. I also expect him to show ways in which we can improve dramatically.

Day 3: Workshops

I'll start the morning with my own workshop From QtWidgets Legacy to QtQuick and beyond. It will be two hours long and it will be all about live coding with participants input. Hopefully it should be interesting to many, if we're convinced about using tests we all have the same problem: but I already got a pile of untested code?? What can I do with that? We'll see an approach for exactly tackling that problem.

Then I will likely attend Profiling 101. I ended up profiling applications both for KDE projects and for customer projects. Still, Milian is really knowledgeable on the matter, so I'll see if I can learn some new tricks or improve old ones.

For the last workshop, I'm torn... but I think I will attend Put your code to the test! by Shantanu Tushar. This is so nice to feel less alone at banging the test drums! Also I expect to learn and share on the use of mocks and stubs as my thinking is still evolving on those.

And that's it?

Of course not! The great value of Akademy is outside the official sessions. Like any good conference, a lot is happening in the hallway and during social events. This unofficial track is where great ideas appear.

Also the rest of the week we will have BoF sessions. I plan to limit myself to only three this year: Frameworks, PIM and French Promo. This way it should free me enough time to make good progress on Zanshin. Lately Akademy has been more meetings than coding for me... This year I want my share of coding!

I'm Going to Akademy 2014

This post is part of a series about the KDE Manifesto

So the cat is finally out of the bag... The KDE Manifesto has been officially announced. It probably came as a surprise to some of you, and since I got a unique perspective in its birth I thought it'd would be a good idea to blog about it to give some background information.

So why this unexpected party and the sudden release of this document? Well, like most unexpected events, it is the realization of an unnoticed process set in motion a long while ago. I think I would have a hard time to pin point exactly when the need to have such a document appeared in the subconscious of the community... My opinion is that it should probably have been done a few of years ago. I'm sure of one thing though, it became necessary because our community evolved in a way that its creators didn't expect.

Now, let's jump back to October 14th 1996, a student named Matthias Ettrich sent an email announcing a new project. If we examine this announcement today, what is immediately obvious? Let's see... It was an energic call to arms. It was very developer centric. It laid down some of the main technical choices. It was limited in scope by providing a list of the components a desktop needs. Also, at the same time it pointed out that more than what was listed might be needed, claiming it's a very open project.

After this announcement, people started to join and to happily work on KDE. They clearly delivered, release after release, KDE was getting bigger and better. Nobody really thought about the community which formed, it was all about the technical artifacts (which is totally fine, I'm not judging). This trend continued for years, pushing KDE (the desktop) toward its popular success, while the community making KDE was growing.

It's time to fast track to the year 2006! The community behind KDE is busier than ever (the first KDE 4.0 alpha will be released the following year), and all this activity shows how big and complex this community became. Teams formed, not every team progressed at the same speed or had the exact same vision of the whole. Clearly something happened in our community which changed it.

That same year we had Akademy in Dublin, probably one of my favorite Akademies. And remembering that particular edition two things struck me:

  • The first one is Aaron Seigo's keynote which was subtitled "The Quest for Project Identity and Definition"... Interesting, in retrospect, isn't it? But lots of people probably attended it, I won't spend more time on it, you probably got the idea from the title.

  • The second one got probably unnoticed to most. It is one of those tiny details which are really precious because the event passes quickly... and somehow I remember it vividly, it touched something in me and stayed in my memory. During that Akademy, Matthias Welwarsky was chairing the community track of the conference. During one of the introductions, and probably in reaction of the keynote mentionned above, he said that to him "KDE is not a project anymore, because a project has an end, it has become an on-going process".

And here it is... I think that in one sentence, Matthias Welwarsky has put the biggest change which happened to KDE in plain sight. The event which was unforseen by the creators of our community, at some point between 1996 and 2006, KDE became an "on-going process". And that's right, if you look at the original announcement of KDE, all of the goals set there were reached in 2006...

KDE was still operating, but in the unknown, what is this "on-going process" trying to solve? Nobody could provide an answer to that question anymore. Somehow we created something self-sustaining which was delivering more and more software.

It took a few more years before someone really tried to visit what was going on and to characterize what KDE meant... At that point it was clear it wasn't simply about KDE the desktop anymore, the community was doing much more than that. That's why in 2009, our marketing team took the lead and announced the repositioning of the KDE brand. KDE wasn't a product brand anymore, so not a single KDE the desktop anymore, but it was a vendor brand. It meant that from now on KDE the community was producing (among other things) a desktop. The new word on the street was "KDE released KDE Platform 4.5", "KDE released Kontact 4.7" and so on... Quite a change of perspective!

I know some people didn't really like the marketing team taking the lead on that... I don't have a strong opinion about the exact content of the repositioning, but it clearly was the tip of the iceberg of the mutation of KDE. It had the merit of making it explicit at last!

At the same time, despite such a brand repositioning being welcome, it was not enough to address the changes in our community. It emerged because we kept going after reaching the goals set in 1996. It emerged because we were creating more and more diverse products: development platforms, workspaces, desktop applications, mobile applications, even server applications (Kolab was born in our ranks, ownCloud would appear in 2010). But, it didn't allow to answer "what is a KDE project?".

And that's pretty much the situation we were at in early 2012. "KDE" is the name of the community, and this community makes products. So we're in a situation where "a project is a KDE project because it has been created by people in the KDE community". It's not exactly satisfying though... What if someone from the community creates a database system? is it a KDE project? (hint: the answer depends on who you ask) What if someone outside the community creates a mobile application? can it join the KDE community? under which conditions?

I'm not making this up. Those are real questions which arose over the years... and we never had a tool to help us devise a proper answer. We dealt with that in an ad hoc manner, and it was a growing pain. I'll go as far as saying it had potential to hurt the cohesion of the community.

That's what we're trying to fix, and we'll see how in the next post of this series. :-)

Only a few days left before the Desktop Summit 2011, I'm really looking forward to wander around in Berlin again. I'm excited and almost counting hours before my flight out on friday morning! Yes, I'll be there:

I'm going to Desktop Summit 2011

And I'm not just attending, I'm also giving a talk on monday during the afternoon (3:20pm to 3:50pm). It's titled "We're a family" and it's a look back at the efforts I put into a Community/University collaboration in Toulouse for the past few years. I had talks around that topic already for an Akademy, but this one is going to be special for two reasons.

First, it'll be much less about the organizational challenges such a collaboration carries than the human impacts it can generate. Here it'll really be about showing the bonds it created among the people participating in this collaboration, and the opportunities it created for the students in the community projects. It will also cover the local and global influences those students had on the community.

Second, the course of study where this collaboration was taking place is closing... Right now it's not yet clear if the students projects we had in the past will still be possible. So this talk is really a wrap up about what happened in Toulouse for the past few years, and probably a "goodbye". Even if we manage to create a new collaboration somehow, this talk marks the end of an era. That's why we tried and managed to line up several generation of students related to this adventure. We'll have a lot to share, but maybe not enough time for all the most juicy secrets. ;-)

So, if you're looking for some laugh, tears, and insights on such a Community/University collaboration, hopefully it'll be the right talk to attend. Don't miss it!

On my side I'm putting the finishing touch to the talk, and of course it'll be ready on time.

Posted on 31 Jul 2011
Tags: Community  Conference  KDE  Toulouse 

If anyone out there wonder why Aaron Seigo's blog is down, the reason is pretty simple... Its author got burnt out because of some of the poisonous people in our project. The story started several weeks ago (probably even months ago) with constant bashing of some of the decisions taken in the Plasma project (which is not a one person project by the way). It culminated last week with very rude and useless mail threads on kde-devel, and yesterday on the dot with personal attacks.

That's why Aaron decided to retire from the public and do what he truely loves: code. No more blogs, minimal involvement on lists and IRC to ensure coordination with the other developers. That's what we obtained after those weeks of angry poisonous mobs. You might think: "well you can ignore them". Really? Could you? Such people can bring a lot of stop energy. Really a lot of it, and that worries me. It seems that the project I love is not a nice place to live in anymore.

When we are able to turn down one of our public face, someone very active and energetic, we really crossed a line. Of course, we could shake head, and think "tsss, those poisonous people, they've no idea what they're doing". That's even probably what we did during those weeks of bashing... and still we let it happen. I think that's the most frightening side of the issue: nobody stepped up, and no actions are taken to make KDE a better place again. Oh, and don't worry, I have my share of guilt in this story... I didn't step up either.

Worse than the stop energy carried by poisonous people, there's the apathy of your peers. I don't want that anymore! We have to end it!

Of course, I'd like to propose a way out, but I've not much to propose. Here are my attempts at bringing some improvements proposing some actions which could be taken (in no particular order):

  • Recruit more editors for the dot, as far as I know they're overbooked and can hardly moderate it;
  • To help the dot editors, we have to improve it's engine with a real moderation system (how come most news site I know have one but not the dot?);
  • Write a code of conduct (probably something for the e.V. membership), and publish it as soon as possible;
  • Enforce it, especially on mailing lists and on bugzilla, mediating as necessary, and banning people in the most extreme cases.

That's definitely not much, but that's a start... More ideas are welcome, but most of all: acts are needed. We must stop this kind of behavior.

PS: I'm not linking any thread, bugreport or mails on purpose. I don't want to point finger. Aaron's reaction is a symptom of something broken in our community (in the broad sense, all contributors and users included) it's just an example (and not the first case). If you want specifics, do your homework and dig our archives it's all public anyway.

Posted on 25 Jun 2008
Tags: aseigo  Community  KDE 

Once again I didn't blog in a while... In particular I didn't blog about this year project students even if they got covered once in the commit digest. Now we're two weeks away from the official end of those projects, so I thought it might be a good idea to show some of their accomplishment.

Kapman

This year we experimented with a project starting from scratch, and apparently we had some demand for a copy of an old famous game... hence why now we have Kapman! It's kicking and alive, it's in a pretty good shape already so maybe it'll be able to enter kdegames in 4.1. Of course it's all SVG based so you can freely resize it (artists wanted!).

Kapman!

Kscd

We also poked the good old Kscd... Our team made quite a lot of improvements in there. In particular it's now fully themable using SVG (artists wanted!), and uses MusicBrainz to identify discs. Of course it also got the expected KDE4 refactoring: it got ported to Phonon and Solid.

Kscd with SVG support

Ksirk

Ksirk is one of those games we have in playground for quite some time. One of our team has been working on it to improve its quality and make it releasable... It's definitely getting there. They mainly worked on improving its usability and that shows in my opinion. At least now I feel like I could play with it for hours. :-)

Ksirk improved

Kopete

Last but not least, this year we got a team working on Kopete. They did an awesome job, it's harder to demo or to make a screenshot for it, but they mainly focused on integrating support for UPnP and for the new live messenger protocol. On the UI front it looks less impressive, but I'm very proud of this team, they definitely had the hardest project to work on and learned a lot. Since I had no screenshot to offer, here is a picture of today's "Kopete Gang of Four" who attended the hacking session:

Kopete Gang of Four
From left to right: Maximilien Verdier, Michel Saliba, Romain Castan, Kevin Kin-Foo.

A few words on the hacking sessions...

Of course, after last year projects we kept the good habit of having KDE Hacking Sessions in Toulouse, we even have now a few people who are coming regularly... the community is definitely growing here. And during the student projects we have an unusual amount of my students showing up. ;-)

KDE Hacking Session March 2008
From left to right: Sylvere Lestang, Kevin Kin-Foo, Romain Castan, Michel Saliba, Maximilien Verdier, Stanislas Krzywda, Anne-Marie Mahfouf.

Missing on the picture: Thibault Normand who arrived later, and Alexis Menard who is unfortunately sick today.

Posted on 08 Mar 2008
Tags: Community  KDE  Toulibre  Toulouse 

For the second time in my life have been interviewed... It's part of the People Behind KDE serie. Thanks a lot to fab for his patience, since well I'm not that cooperative with interviews. ;-)

It even made it to the Dot, with an article.

So now you can read my People Behind KDE interview to know how lovely or mad (it's your choice) I am.

Posted on 26 Aug 2005
Tags: Community  KDE